<img src="https://d5nxst8fruw4z.cloudfront.net/atrk.gif?account=53pUm1a4KM+2vg" style="display:none" height="1" width="1" alt="" />
TRG in the Board Room Blog

3 best tactics for recruiting Millennials - Part 1

Posted by Huy Tran on

Recruitment is a series of challenges that the HR department has to continually solve, from sourcing candidates to screening, interviewing, choosing the best fit and persuading them to accept the offer. Each challenge can be solved, but how well depends on organisations’ willingness to look at each group of candidates and do the following as it pertains to the successful recruitment of each group’s members: 1) keep the effective solutions, 2) stop the ineffective ones and 3) start new strategies. This is called the K-S-S method.

Tactics for recruiting Millennials

When applying the K-S-S method to recruiting Millennials, what should you focus on? There are three aspects that require your thorough consideration. In this blog, we will discuss the first aspect. 

Get Social

Vietnamese Millennials spend up to 27.2 hours weekly doing online activities, of which a considerable part is spent accessing social networks. Luckily, despite the negative impacts of abusing social networks, Millenials have been using these as a new channel for job seeking.

Keep: Using social networks to communicate job opportunities and interact with candidates

Does your organisation have an official fanpage on Facebook or a company page on LinkedIn? Take advantage of these channels to post your requisitions. Chances are that you will receive applications from those who “liked” your organisation on Facebook or whose friends tagged them in the comments so they’d see the listing. Alongside looking for opportunities online, Millennials also pay attention to building their professional images online, especially via personal profiles and activities on LinkedIn and other recruiting forums. You can find passive candidates through these channels – particularly LinkedIn – with whom you can interact and introduce opportunities to. Passive candidates take up a large portion of potential candidates, so don’t forget this “promised land”.

Additionally, if your vacancies are for technical or specialised jobs, use forums or groups designed for such job categories. Once you target the right audiences for your vacancies, narrow the search further to find candidates within those forums that satisfy the specialised requirements.

Stop: Ignoring online complaints about the organisation from internal and external sources

If not handled carefully, social networks are a double-edged blade for your organisation’s reputation. Your current employees, in a moment during which they can’t control their emotions, might post negative statuses, complaining about the organisation, the job, the manager, colleagues or even conflicts and drawbacks in the working environment. They might argue that those statuses are limited to their friends and followers, but as the news spreads, information from a close source is more valid than rumours, causing serious damage to an organisation’s image in a potential candidate’s eyes.

Ensure that your employees come to you in case of frustration and solve the problems internally instead of bringing them online. When this doesn’t happen, spend time discovering the reasons behind their complaints and use them to improve. Don’t forget to use social networks to communicate such improvement!

Start: Engaging employer branding in social recruiting plan

You might have heard of “The Candidate” – an impressive recruitment campaign by Heineken back in 2013. They have recently kicked off a new one called “Go Places”. In a quick personality test in the form of an interactive online video, Heineken embeds an introduction into its organisational values as well as its working environment and employee lifestyle. Whether or not “Go Places” becomes a remarkable campaign like “The Candidate”, this online branding tactic is rather effective. Besides Heineken, many organisations convey their image to potential candidates via a number of social networks, such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and even Instagram.

In Vietnam, Facebook is the main tool to execute employer branding due to its popularity with young adults. Instead of posting a simple introduction or a plain requisition, provide your potential candidates a close look at activities within your company, especially those revolving around young employees. Short sharings with the hashtag #Ichose{company’s name}because are also worth trying!

Why your leadership development program fails 

Topics: Talent Management

Subscribe to TRG Blog

Follow Us

Subscribe to TRG Blog

Our Editorial Mission

rick yvanovich resized 174

 Rick Yvanovich
 /Founder & CEO/

With TRG International Blogs, it is our mission to be your preferred partner providing solutions that work and we will make sure to guide your business to greatness every day.

Upcoming Events

Posts by Topic

see all